WHAT IS KOFU SCHOOL
 
 
 Ikebana is the Japanese art of flower arrangement.
The Kofu School of Ikebana was established in Kanagawa Prefecture in 1935 where its headquarters continues to this today.


What is "IKEBANA"

  “IKEBANA” is an old traditional Japanese art, now spread far and wide throughout the world.

  Like the offering flower on the alter opens in bloom, “IKEBANA” style is born – backed by six hundred long years and carrying many and varied opinions. It has surpassed the years building up vicissitudes being so closely connected with the styles of living, amidst Japan’s natural features.

  The tiny flower we accidentally see by the roadside, grows virtually unnoticed, and can speak no wards, yet man feels so attracted to it and it is from its quietness that we strive to draw out so much from it. It depends on how we exchange feelings with flowers that we can refresh our hearts from a new breeze that enters it, and in this natural state mold an individuality all our own.

   To like flowers means to love their beauty, to enjoy their goodness which, no doubt, leads to a gradual belief in their hidden truth.

  “IKEBANA” is a traditional art, as well as, a new art which reveals the beautiful feelings of the modern spirit. While enjoying it in a society backed by a spiritual culture, the art is still being searched from many angles, and while weighing the progress of skill and a new self, we are spreading beauty in our lives and so let us learn to benefit from a life we can make ever more beautiful and abundant.


First Headmistress - Saigetsu Yamamoto


     Kofu School was founded in 1935. Its Headmistress, Saigetsu Yamamoto was a Director of Nihon Ikebana Geijutsu Kyokai, and Executive Director and examiner of several Ikebana associations throughout Japan, including a foreign ladies group. 

  Saigetsu Yamamoto's interest in the arrangement of flowers dates to early childhood. She studied under tutors of Koryu school of Ikebana, from which she received high degrees.

  Being a creative person, her aspirations were not fulfilled until a school could be founded to express her many new ideas of arranging plant materials. The name Kofu means "light wind" and Saigetsu means "clear moon". The two words combine to refer to serenity of mind, through which one could attain the utmost of floral art.

  She exhibited her arrangements consistently at all of the major Ikebana exhibitions in Tokyo, Yokohama, Kanagawa prefecture and throughout Japan.  World Conventions of Ikebana International had appreciated her art, and she featured regularly in the Women's Ikebana Exhibition of Roses sponsored by Shufunotomo Co, Ltd. 

  Saigetsu Yamamoto had visited over 60 cities in the United Stated, and had held numerous one-man exhibitions and demonstrations, and appeared on television in most of the United States, and in numerous other countries.

  She was one of the pioneers who initiated the teaching of Ikebana to foreigner women living on the military bases in Yokohama, Yokosuka, Zama and Atsugi, soon after the end of World War . In those days she made every effort to introduce the teachings of Ikebana, and was often seen being driven to her destinations through snowy fields in a military jeep, due to limited means of transportation in the years immediately following the war.

Saigetsu Yamamoto had endeavored continuously to make Japanese Ikebana a worldwide bond of friendship, as can be seen by the fact that many of her former Ikebana students are scattered throughout the world.

  Despite the fact that it is a comparatively new school of Ikebana, Kofu is highly regarded and recognized and its founder and former headmistress, Saigetsu Yamamoto, is widely acclaimed by fellow Ikebana masters. Her style of arrangement at the 5th International Ikebana Convention was demonstrated at the North American Regional Conference in Boston in May 1968 and also in South-East Asia and Australia at the 10th Regional Australian Conference in May 1974, and the Regional New Zealand Conference in April, 1983.

Kofu School was founded in 1935. Its Headmistress, Saigetsu Yamamoto was a Director of Nihon Ikebana Geijutu Kyokai, and Executive Director and examiner of several Ikebana associations throughout Japan, including a foreign ladies group.


  Second Headmistress - Yogetsu Yamamoto

 Second Headmistress, Yogetsu Yamamoto, studied Ikebana from early childhood from beside Saigetsu Yamamoto. The name "Yogetsu" means “the glory of the radiant rays of the rising sun.” 

Yogetsu Yamamoto has successfully produced two major Kofu Ikebana Exhibitions, and she has taken the leading role in the success of the Enshu Isshinkai and Kofu Exhibitions.  Furthermore, she continues to exhibit her arrangements consistently at all of the major Ikebana exhibitions in Tokyo, Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Kanazawa Prefecture, as well as other parts of Japan.

  Yogetsu Yamamoto arrangements can be viewed annually at the Ikebana International Fair in Tokyo, attended by Princess Takamado. She, too, continues the Kofu tradition of endeavoring to create worldwide bonds of friendship through the art of ikebana.

  Presently, Yogetsu Yamamoto continues teaching Ikebana at the Kofu Head School, US military base, as well as at a prestigious junior high school and high school in Japan. 

  


Vice-Headmistress  - Hangetsu Yamamoto

  Fluent in English, Hangetsu Yamamoto introduced Kofu Ikebana to countless foreign residents of Japan on US military bases, international schools, and other foreign establishments in Kanagawa Prefecture. 

  Her charm, wit, sense of humor, and love of life as an instructor of Kofu ikebana inspired all who were fortunate enough to avail of her lessons. Hangetsu Yamamoto focused on helping each student discover and bring out the natural beauty of even a simple or seemingly insignificant flower, bud, leaf or branch, in order to create arrangements which skillfully incorporated natural beauty, natural harmony, and the student’s own creative ability.






横浜 光風流
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